Dark Chocolate Cherry Muffins

Dark chocolate and dried cherry muffins made with a healthy serving of oats, peanut butter, and yogurt! Perfect for the holidays, these muffins are made with canola oil and a reduced amount of sugar. A generous amount of Greek yoghurt also gives them a unique flavor. 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup rolled oats
  • ½ cup of brown sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 ½ cups plain Greek yoghurt
  • ¼ cup peanut butter
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ½ cup dried red cherries, chopped
  • 1/3 cup chopped dark chocolate

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400°F. Line twelve 2 1/2-inch muffin cups with paper bake cups. In a large bowl stir together all-purpose flour, oats, the brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

In another bowl whisk together eggs, yogurt, peanut butter, and oil.

Add yogurt mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir until just moistened. 

Fold in cherries and chocolate.

Spoon batter into muffin cups.

Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until golden. Cool in muffin cups on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Serve warm. Makes 12 muffins.

How did your dark chocolate cherry muffins turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Microwave Rocky Road Fudge

Delicious chocolate fudge packed with peanuts and marshmallows to make a chewy, crunchy, salty & sweet Rocky Road Fudge! This recipe is quick and super easy to make in the microwave.

Ingredients

• 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
• 14 ounces sweetened condensed milk
• 1/4 cup butter
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 2 cups miniature marshmallows
• 1 cup salted peanuts (or use a mix of walnuts, almonds or other nuts)

Instructions

Combine the milk, the chocolate, and the butter in a medium size glass bowl and heat in the microwave for 90 seconds (or melt the chocolate, milk and butter in a double boiler on the stove top).

Stir to combine and heat another 15 seconds if needed. Add the vanilla extract and stir until smooth.

Stir in the peanuts (or substitute with walnuts or almonds, or a mix of all three) and marshmallows – you may need to transfer the mixture to a larger bowl. 

Scoop the mixture onto a parchment lined tray. Spread with a spatula to approximately 1-inch thickness.

Chill until ready to serve. Slice into squares and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

You can also store this in the freezer! How did your rocky road turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Big day out: renting a boat and exploring the Kona Coast

What could be better than cruising along the Kona Coast? We took the plunge. We rented a boat from Kona Boat Rentals for the day to find out how it works, what it costs and, crucially, is it worth it?

Big day out

We all arrived at the parking lot in front of Kona Boat Rentals at 9am sharp to find that two of our friends couldn’t make it, so the group of 6 was now reduced to 4. We had originally booked a six person boat, but quickly found that while it could easily accommodate 6 people, it was very spacious with just 4. 

After a comprehensive orientation and question and answer session with Eric we were ready to go – some of us more nervous than others, but who could resist the calm inviting waters of the harbor as we gently motored out toward the ocean.

Kona Boat rental 3
Clem and Angus
Kona Boat rental 3a
Leaving the harbor

What to bring

We all packed an assortment of snacks, lunch and plenty of water. Don’t forget sunscreen, sunglasses (reflection off the ocean can be intense), and a sweater – just in case you get chilled.

Each boat comes with the following:

  • GPS & charts of the coast
  • Directions to locations of interest
  • Snorkeling and fishing equipment.
  • Fishing Gear: Penn Rods & Reels, Fishfinder, Lures, Fighting Belt, Leader Gloves, Fish Bat & Gaff
  • Snorkel Gear: Mask, Snorkel, Fins, Boarding Ladder/Swim Step (Scuba gear is available).
  • Each boat also has electronics: Global Positioning Satellite Receiver (GPS), VHF radio, Tri-Beam Fish finder and Depth Gauge.
  • Anchor, mooring & dock lines and fenders. All Coast Guard required and inspected equipment.
  • Detailed Charts with GPS coordinates for over 30 moorings sites located along the Kona Coast.
  • Captains, Guides, and Scuba Instructors are available for hire with 48-hour notice.

     

Kona Boat rental 5
Out in the open ocean!

Heading north

Most boat renters make the decision to head south, in the direction of Kealakekua Bay and the well-known snorkeling hotspot. We decided to venture north towards Makalawena Beach, a white sandy beach just south of Kua Bay (read about our recent hiking trip to Makalawena Beach here).

We had rented the boat for 6 hours, giving us plenty of time to explore the coast, drop anchor somewhere picturesque and have lunch before returning to Kona.

Kona Boat rental 6
Makalawena Beach with Hualalai in the background

After a smooth journey north we dropped the anchor (making sure to drop it into the sand and not the coral reef) and jumped in the water. We were careful not to get too close to shore due to the currents. Snorkeling is also possible in this location and the water is incredibly clear.

Kona from the sea

Kona Boat rental 9

After lunch we still had plenty of ocean-going time on the clock so we headed south past the harbor to Kona, cruising along the waterfront  and enjoying a very different perspective of Old Kona and the downtown area.

Kona Boat rental 8

So far none of us were sea sick – the Kona waters were living up to their reputation for being relatively calm and easy to navigate, and we all took turns at the wheel. There wasn’t time to include a further trip to Kealakekua Bay – we recommend deciding which direction to head and work out your timing based no that. Make sure you allow plenty of time for your return journey.

Back to the harbor

A day spent on the boat went incredibly quickly and it was soon time to head back to the harbor and get used to walking on dry land again! Once we reached the outer buoy near the harbor entrance we called Eric, and by the time we reached the dock he was waiting with the trailer to bring us in. 

Is it worth it?

Hiring a boat won’t be for everyone. The cost of doing so for just a short period of time is relatively expensive. But it is a fantastic experience and a great way to have your very own private tour without the crowds. So if you’re looking for a different way to enjoy the Kona Coast, consider renting a boat for a few hours, or even the day!

Kona Boat Rentals

Kona Boat Rentals is located at Honokohau Small Boat Harbor in Kailua-Kona. They offer full and half-day rentals. The new 21-foot center console boats are large enough for 6 adults and have a bimini top for shade. Don’t worry you’ll be given an orientation prior to sailing, covering everything from boat operations to tips on where you should go. A license is not necessary! And don’t worry, the Kona Coast has some of the calmest and most easily navigable waters in the Pacific.

Cost: 4 hours $425 or 6 hours $555 for the boat we chose – 21 foot, 150 HP. Find out more here.

(This is not a paid promotion for Kona Boat Rentals but we definitely do recommend them!)

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Off the beaten track: Makalawena Beach

Makalawena Beach is located in Kekaha Kai State Park on the west side of the Big Island. The beach park is located north of Kona and is one of the lesser known and little-visited of the white sand beaches on the island, and is well worth the hike!

Makalawena Beach is nestled in Pu’u Ali’l Bay, between Kua Bay and Mahai’ula Beach. Makalawena means ‘mischievous winds’ and legend has it that the Hawaiian wind goddess Laamaomao irritated the other gods causing them to cut off her nose. The nose is Pu’u Ku’ili – the cinder cone within the state park.

Fun fact: Kekaha Kai derives from the Hawaiian phrase ke kaha kai which means ‘the shore line’.

What to take

Your hiking gear – and sensible shoes (flip flops are not very practical on the rocky trail). Take lots of water and enough (reef-friendly) sunscreen.

How to get there

Take Hwy. 19 north of Kailua-Kona. Access to Mahaiula Bay and Makalawena Beach is between mile markers 90 and 91 on Highway 19, there is a sign on the Highway at the intersection. The lava road is rough so take care, especially if you are driving a regular car and not a 4-wheel-drive vehicle. If your car has low clearance, you may want to walk it. The end of the road is 1.5 miles from the highway entrance. Follow the road until you arrive at a locked gate on the side of the road and park there.

The trail

At the parking lot is the beginning of the first part of the trail. It’s signposted ‘Makalawena Trail”. It’s approximately a 20 minute walk from here to Mahai’ula Beach. Find the trail head to Makalawena Beach at the end of Mahai’ula Beach. Continue on from here until you come to Pu’u Ali’l Bay and Makalawena Beach. The hike is about 2 miles in total.

Makalawena 2a
Mahai'ula Beach
Makalawena 4
Historic home c.1880s
Makalawena 7
Mahai'ula Beach
Makalawena 6
Mahai'ula Beach

Makalawena Beach

Makalawena 11
Makalawena Beach

The white sand beach is perfect for snorkeling and boogie boarding (depending on the time of year – winter brings the better surf). Swimming is great when the water is calm, but stay out of the water if the surf is rough as there isn’t a lifeguard on duty.

Makalawena 10
Makalawena Beach

History

The area around Makalawena Beach is an important Hawaiian site. It used to be a busy fishing village and the nearby Opaeula Pond (opaelua means red shrimp) is a national natural landmark and was used by the Hawaiians as a fishpond.

Makalawena 12
Makalawena Beach

Pu'u Ku'ili

Looking for another hike? Try hiking to the top of the nearby Pu’u Ku’ili cinder cone. Continue to hike north through the park on the historic coastal trail, Ala Kahakai, which leads to Kua Bay. At the midway point hike up the cinder cone (342 feet high) for some great views of the Kona Coast. Alternatively you can drive to Kua Bay and hike south, climb the cinder cone and then walk on to Makalawena Beach.

The beach park is open daily 8am-7pm. During humpback season (November – March) Makalawena Beach can be a great place to watch the humpback whales breaching offshore.

Makalawena is one of the best kept secrets of the Big Island. An easy hike in is worth it for what awaits you –  a classic white sand beach, clear water and fewer people than your average Hawaiian beach!

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Pumpkin and apple muffins

Perfect for this time of year, pumpkin and apple muffins make a great alternative to the pumpkin pie. This recipe is quick and easy! Add a pecan and a sprinkle of cinnamon sugar for that something extra.

Ingredients

3 cups flour
1 tbsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp pumpkin spice
1 30 oz can pumpkin puree
6 eggs
1 1/2 cup oil
1 cup brown sugar
3 medium sized apples, chopped (Granny smith work best. Use an apple peeler/corer/slicer device to make it easier).

Optional

24 pecans
A sprinkle of cinnamon sugar

Instructions

In a bowl place flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and pumpkin spice. Whisk and set aside.

In another bowl blend pumpkin puree, eggs, oil, brown sugar and chopped apples.

Stir dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture being careful not to over mix, small lumps are ok.

Use an ice cream scoop to spoon the mixture into greased muffin molds (I used silicon, but you can also use paper cups to line the muffin molds instead of greasing). 

Optional – place one pecan on top of each muffin and sprinkle lightly with a pinch of cinnamon sugar.

Bake muffins at 350F for 25-30 minutes, or until they spring back when lightly touched.

How did your muffins turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Cleopatra & Ele’ele: Horizon’s newest and cutest Labrador retrievers

As many of you might be aware we’ve been without dogs for a while and it just so happened that recently we made contact with a breeder who was only weeks away from having some puppies available – and we couldn’t resist!

Day 1

After a short drive home we introduced our new puppies to the property. They were tiny! The black Labrador retriever we named Ele’ele Ninja and the golden we named Cleopatra Hermione. Both are certified pedigree Labrador Retrievers from American Kennel Club breeders. They are sisters, sharing the same father but different mothers (two different litters). And there’s only two days difference in age! Ele was born August 8 and Cleo August 6, 2021.

Eleʻele is Hawaiian for black and her name is pronounced Ally. 

Cleopatra is Cleo for short (and Cleopatra when she’s misbehaving!)

 

When they first arrived at the end of September they were only 7 weeks old. Ele was barely 8 pounds and Cleo was 12.

Cleo and Ele already have their own Instagram account where we post their adventures (and misadventures). Follow along @cleo_and_ele 

Fun Facts about Labrador retrievers

  1. They love water. Their thick tails acts as a rudder, and their large feet are perfect for propelling them through the water.
  2. They were originally bred as hunting dogs and they are great at retrieving things! (Surprise!)
  3. They are intelligent and they work hard. They can be service dogs, therapy dogs, search and rescue dogs, or even work on bomb detection teams!
  4. They have endless energy and need to be walked every day in order to get the exercise they need.
  5. They come in three colors: yellow, black and chocolate.

Any place is a good place to nap! We are crate training Cleo and Ele, so they have their own large crate which they share together. It’s a space for sleeping and generally relaxing, the idea being it replicates the safety and security of a natural den. In the photo above, Cleo decided that sleeping under an office chair on wheels was a good idea! 

Best Friends

Ele and Cleo

They might playfight during the day but they’re the best of friends already and often fall asleep curled up next to each other, or even on each other! What ever is most comfortable!

Cleo and Ele are already getting used to the property, although we’re not allowing them free range just yet. They recently met the donkeys, Poncho and Lefty, and immediately ran in the opposite direction before observing these strange creatures from a safe distance.

Cleo on a walk
Ele

Fun fact: Ele and Cleo already love water. Whether it’s drinking from the end of the hose, splashing about in their water bowl or playing with ice cubes in a tub of water on a hot day – they’re definitely water babies. Next up, supervised swim lessons in the pool!

Both of them have unique barks. And Ele has a large vocabulary of very cute whines and groans that seem to indicate anything from “I need a cuddle” to “I’m hungry/tired” or “I’m just stretching – but look how cute I am!”. Cleo is quieter, so when you she gets your attention you know it’s serious – or she just really wants a snack.

Best Friends Cleo and Ele

They’re both currently in quarantine due to their vaccination schedule. They’ll be able to greet guests up close and personal in early December, once all their shots are completed. 

We can’t wait for you to meet them!

Easy lemon yoghurt cake

This recipe for lemon yoghurt cake uses oil instead of butter and delivers a moist lemon cake. Almost as easy as the all-in-one chocolate cake, our own version involves mixing all wet and dry ingredients separately and then together – easy!

Ingredients

For the cake:

½ cup plain yogurt or Greek yogurt

1 cup granulated sugar

3 large eggs

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt
grated lemon zest from

1 medium-size lemon

½ cup sunflower grape seed or canola oil

For the glaze:

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

¾ cup of powdered sugar

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400F. Place butter in a large, ovenproof, nonstick sauté pan (10” with slanted sides works best) and place in oven.

Preheat the oven to 350˚F (175˚C). Spray an 8-inch round cake pan with baking spray, cover inside surface of pan evenly with the spray. Line bottom of pan with parchment paper and spray parchment paper lightly. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the yogurt, sugar, eggs and oil – stirring until well blended.

In another bowl combine the flour, baking powder, salt and zest, mixing until just combined.

Add the dry ingredients into the wet and mix until well combined.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan.

Bake for 30-40 minutes or until the cake feels springy to the touch and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Be careful not to overbake.

Cool cake on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Combine the lemon juice and powdered sugar in a small bowl and stir until smooth. Gently prick the surface of the cake with a fork to allow the glaze to permeate. With a pastry brush, gently pat the glaze all over the cake. Keep going over the cake until the glaze is gone. Allow cake to cool completely. 

Sprinkle with powdered sugar if desired, or split in half and fill with a lemon curd and a layer of whipped cream. How did your cake turn out? Let us know in the comments below!

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Understanding Ahupuaʻa: Ancient Hawaii’s unique land division model

Hawaiian Chiefs 3
Konohiki – Chief Stewards

In ancient Hawaii land ownership was overseen by the king. An island (mokupuni) was made up of a number of large sections of land (moku). Each of these individual moku were divided into ahupuaʻa (‘ahoo-poo-ah-ah’). Ahupuaʻa are narrow wedge-shaped pieces of land (like a piece of pie) that run from the mountains (mauka) to the sea (makai).

Ahupuaʻa would vary in size and this was dependent on how resource-rich the area was (an ahupuaʻa would be made larger in order to compensate for its lack of agricultural productivity). For example, Kahuku, which contains large tracts of lava fields on the southern slopes of Mauna Loa, was the largest ahupuaʻa on the island of Hawaiʻi with over 184,000 acres. Each of these wedges of land were ruled by a local chief known as an aliʻi.

Honolulu Board of Water Supply
Photo credite: Honolulu Board of Water Supply (Hawaiihistory.org)

Why was it called Ahupuaʻa?

Because the boundary of each section of land was marked by a stack (ahu) of stones where a pig  (puaʻa) or pig’s image (some kind of carving) was often placed as tribute (or tax) to the local chief.

Ahupua'a boundary marker. Photo credit: Thomas Tunsch, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Why was it created?

Each ahupuaʻa is considered to be a self-sufficient community. Those in the mountains or upland forested areas, would trade with those closer to the ocean. The slice of land would stretch from the top of a mountain down to the shoreline in a wedge shape. Rainwater would be diverted into streams in the upper valleys carrying the water down to irrigate the crops grown near the ocean. In this way it was easier to travel up and downstream within an ahupuaʻa than from one stream valley to a neighboring valley. This arrangement ensured that an ahupuaʻa would include fish and salt from the sea, areas of agricultural land for taro and sweet potato, and the forest – to provide timber for construction.

The agricultural system was divided into two groups: irrigated and rain-fed. Within the irrigated systems taro was grown and within the rain-fed systems, mostly ʻuala (sweet potato), yams and dryland taro. Other cultivated crops included coconuts (niu), ʻulu (breadfruit), bananas (maiʻa) and sugar cane (kō). The kukui tree was often used as a shade tree for the dry crops. Alongside the crops, Hawaiians kept dogs, chickens and domesticated pigs.

Local residents who lived under the chief’s rule would pay a regular tax to an overseer (konohiki) who would also determine how the resources in the ahupuaʻa would be used.

HAVO-Ahupuaa-Map
The division of districts and ahupuaʻa in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park (adapted from the National Park Service publication "In the Realm of Pele-honua-mea" by M.J. Tomonari-Tuggle)

Traditional subdivision system

The Hawaiian Islands were subdivided in the following way:

Mokupuni (the whole islands, except Kahoʻolawe):

  • Hawaiʻi
  • Kauaʻi
  • Lānaʻi
  • Maui
  • Moloka’i
  • Niʻihau
  • Oʻahu

Moku (is the largest subdivision of an island)

Ahupuaʻa

ʻili (usually two to three per ahupuaʻa)

Ahupuaʻa were not entirely self-contained. While they encouraged a high level of resource self-sufficiency for the inhabiting community, there was still room for regional and even interisland trade.

ahupuaa-boundary.ahu_Cypher
Stone ahu, marking the boundary between Kane`ohe and Kailua, at Castle Junction, Oʻahu. Photo credit: Mahealani Cypher Historichawaii.org

Ahupuaʻa were a way of creating cohesive community networks that allowed resources to be used efficiently and also meant the king retained effective control of the islands via a network of Ahupuaʻa chiefs.

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Off the beaten track: Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site

Puukohola Heiau Tclf org
Photo credit: tclf.org

Located beside the small port town of Kawaihae, the Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site is an impressive structure. Built in the late 18th century by Kamehameha I, this site is inextricably linked to the founding of the Hawaiian kingdom. Hiking trails and birdwatching make this well-worth a visit.

History

Pu’ukohola Heiau played a critical role in uniting the Hawaiian Islands. Kamehameha I built the temple due to a prophecy from a priest named Kapoukahi. The priest, told Kamehameha that if he constructed a heiau (temple) on the hill called Pu’ukohoā, and dedicated it to the war god, he would then be able to conquer the islands. The temple was originally built by Kamehameha I in 1790-91. Thousands of men worked for almost a year to build the temple. Upon completion of the temple a chief rival was sacrificed to the war god. Kamehameha I then gained control over the Hawaiian Islands. The monarchy he started lasted from 1810 until 1893.

Where is it?

Photo credit: hawaiitribune-herald.com

The Park is located at 62-3601 Kawaihae Road, Kawaihae. The town of Kawaihae is small with only a few shops and places to eat. This area is the driest part of the entire state of Hawai’i – there is less than 10 inches of rain a year here. 

Directions from Kona International Airport:

Take Highway 19 North for 27 miles. Turn left (north) onto Highway 270 (Kawaihae Road) and go 1/2 mile to the Park entrance (on the left side of highway). Turn left off the highway onto the park road. The Visitor Center is located down the hill just before Spencer Beach County Park.

Directions from Hilo:

Take Highway 19 North 67 miles. Continue on Highway 270 (Kawaihae Road) to the Park entrance (on the left side of highway). Turn left off the highway on to the park road. The Visitor Center is located down the hill just before Spencer Beach County Park.

Directions from North Kohala (Hawi/Kapa’au):

Take Highway 270 South 20 miles to the Park entrance (on the right side of highway). Turn right off the highway on to the park road. The Visitor Center is located down the hill just before Spencer Beach County Park.

Arrival of Keoua Below Puʻukoholā by Herb Kane

What to do

Pu'ukohola and Mailekini heiaus
Photo credit: JustyCinMD / flickr.com

Entry to the historic site is free and the visitors center is open 7:30am – 5pm daily. The visitor center contains a museum with some great exhibits, including an amazing traditional koa wood spear display, and a popular rock-lifting display. There are also some original paintings by artist and historian Herb Kane (the museum is due to reopen to the public November 15). There is also a great view of Puʻukoholā Heiau from the visitor center itself.

There are also a number of hiking trails.

  • The Parkʻs loop trail (1/2 mile)
  • From the Park to Mau’umae Beach (about 3/4 mile) along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail
  • From the Park to Hāpuna Beach (about 3 miles)

Depending on the time of year the Park is a great place to watch the sea life near the shoreline. In the winter it’s a great place to spot humpback whales, while sometimes black-tipped reef shakes and spinner dolphins can also be seen. Or get to the Park early and enjoy the wide variety of bird life.

Pu'ukohola Heiau 2021
Photo credit: nps.gov
Photo credit: nps.gov

Fun fact: Puʻukohola Heiau is best viewed from Kawaihae Harbor Road in the late afternoon. This aspect, with Mauna Kea in the background, makes for a great photo.

Other sites

Also in the Park are some other historical sites of interest.

  • Mailekini Heiau – this was a temple converted into a fort with mounted guns to protect the port.
  • Hale o Kapuni Heiau (Shark Temple) – submerged just off the shoreline of the Park, this temple was for worshipping the shark god that protected the local area.
  • John Young Homestead – the remains of the home of a British sailor who became stranded on the island and then became an advisor to the King.
  • Pelekane (The Royal Courtyard) – just below the temples is the courtyard where foreign dignitaries were received.

If you’re interested in Hawaiian history a visit to the Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site should be near the top of your list. The majestic structure is a fascinating legacy of Kamehameha I’s reign. While its close proximity to nearby Hāpuna Beach makes it the perfect place to visit before a day at the beach. 

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Making a Dutch baby! A puffed pancake recipe with apple and cranberry filling

What exactly is a Dutch baby? A Dutch baby is an oversized puffed pancake which is baked in the oven rather than being fried on the stove top. The Dutch baby likely has its origins in the German Pfannkuchen. The name first appeared in the 1900s when a café in Seattle mistakenly called them Dutch instead of Deutsch! They are also a close relative of the English Yorkshire pudding.

Ingredients

Dutch baby

3 tablespoons butter

3 eggs

¾ cup all-purpose flour

¾ cup milk

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

A pinch of salt

Confectioners’ (icing) sugar (to dust)

Filling

2 Granny Smith apples

2 tablespoons butter

¼ cup brown sugar

1 tsp cinnamon

¼ cup cranberries (or dried fruit)

The zest and juice of 1 small lemon

Grated fresh nutmeg to taste

A pinch of salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400F. Place butter in a large, ovenproof, nonstick sauté pan (10” with slanted sides works best) and place in oven.

In a blender, combine eggs, flour, warm milk (30 seconds in the microwave), sugar, vanilla extract and a pinch of salt. Blend until combined.

Remove the hot pan from the oven. The butter should have melted. Swirl butter around pan to coat entire surface. Pour any remaining butter into the batter and blend. Then pour the batter into the hot pan and return the pan to the oven. Cook until the pancake is puffed in the center and golden brown at the edges. This takes 20-25 minutes.

While the Dutch baby is cooking prepare the filling. Take two Granny Smith apples, peel, core and cut into thin slices. In a frying pan melt the butter and add all the ingredients except the lemon juice. Sautee until apples are tender. Cover with tin foil to avoid the mixture drying out as it’s sauteed. Add the lemon juice once the mixture is cooked.

Remove the Dutch baby from the oven and remove it from the pan with a spatula. Place on a cooling rack to allow the steam to escape and avoid the pancake becoming soggy. Add the apple and cranberry mixture. Slice the pancake into 8 pieces and serve!

Serve with maple syrup or whipped cream, or simply by itself. How did your Dutch baby turn out? Let us know in the comments below!

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