What is a jicama?

JIcama Horizon Guest House Hawaii

What is a jicama? A relatively unknown root vegetable, the jicama is common here on the Big Island of Hawaii. With its flaky brown skin and crispy, white texture, the jicama has a unique flavor that tastes like a cross between a potato and a pear!

Jicama Horizon Guest House Kona Big Island

Pronounced (hee-kah-ma) the versatile vegetable has its origins in Mexico and Central America. It’s now found throughout Asia as well as here in Hawaii.

The jicama plant itself is mostly toxic. The vines of the plant can grow up to 20 feet in length. The root of the plant is the only part of the vegetable that is edible. The rest of the plant including the skin remains toxic, so make sure you peel it well! But don’t let that scare you, the crunchy flesh is a great addition to everything from salads to stir fries.

Jicama Horizon BnB Hawaii

Are jicamas a superfood?

The jicama is seen by many as a superfood since it’s so nutrient dense. The nutrient profile of the jicama is packed with vitamin E, calcium and zinc. Its high in fiber, a great source of vitamin C, and contains that all-important beta carotene! It also contains inulin, a prebiotic that helps with maintaining gut health.

Fun fact: The jicama is also known as water chestnut, Mexican potato and yam bean.

Where to find them

Make trying a jicama part of your Big Island experience! We bought ours from the Hilo farmers market, but you’ll be able to find them at most farmers markets around the island.

Look for firm, dry jicamas. Make sure the skin isn’t bruised and that the vegetable isn’t old and shriveled. Jicamas keep well – after they’ve been peeled they’ll last in the fridge for approximately two weeks. Make sure to keep them wrapped in a container or a plastic bag.

Jicama Burrito HGH
Grated jicama on a burrito

How to eat jicamas

Jicamas can be eaten raw or they can be cooked. First, remove the brownish skin – either cut or peel from the vegetable. Then chop into cubes, slices, or even grate. You’ll find the consistency much like that of a potato, with a kind of watery starchy texture as you cut into it.

We used ours as a topping on a burrito and also chopped up in a salad but there lots of creative ways to cook with jicamas. Don’t worry about oxidation – once you cut into a jicama, the vegetable won’t brown.

Fun fact: In Central America they are often eaten raw – cut into slices, chilled, then drizzled with lemon/lime juice, sprinkled with chilli powder and a dash of salt!

Jicama salad HGH B&B Kona
Cubed jicama in a corn, pepper, cilantro salad

Be creative with jicamas!

Add jicamas to your diet in these creative ways

  • As an ingredient in your favourite fruit salad – works well with pineapple, mango and papaya

  • As a snack – cut into slices and then served with guacamole

  • Use in your favourite vegetable stir-fry

  • Cut into thick French fry-sized pieces (half an inch by half an inch), toss with olive oil and your favourite spices, and then bake on a cookie sheet in a hot oven! Jicama fries!

Some great jicama recipe ideas

  • Kale, jicama and orange salad

  • Spicy black bean burritos with grated jicama

  • Toasted chicken sandwiches with jicama and red cabbage slaw

Take the time to try a jicama on your Big Island adventure. Farmers markets around the island are your best bet for finding the freshest quality produce. How did you use jicamas in your cooking? Let us know in the comments.

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The no-knead bread recipe

No knead bread Horizon Guest House Big Island

This favorite no-knead bread recipe is easy to make and packed full of flavor – wholegrains, nuts and dried fruit. Make sure to use a covered baking dish to help give it that chewy, crusty consistency!

No knead bread HGH

The no-knead bread recipe

  • 3 1/4 cups (390g) Unbleached Bread Flour

  • 1 cup (113g) Whole Wheat Flour

  • 2 teaspoons salt

  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast

  • 1 3/4 cups (397g) cool water

  • 3/4 cup (85g) dried cranberries

  • 1/2 cup (85g) golden raisins

  • 1 cup (113g) coarsely chopped pecans or walnuts

1. Mix the flours, salt, yeast, and water in a large bowl. Stir, then use your hands to bring the sticky dough together, making sure to incorporate all of the flour.  

2. Work in the fruits and nuts.

3. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest at room temperature overnight, or for at least 8 hours; it’ll become bubbly and rise quite a bit, so use a large bowl.

4. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and form it into a log or round loaf to fit your 14″ to 15″ long lidded stoneware baker; 9″ x 12″ oval deep casserole dish with cover; or 9″ to 10″ round lidded baking crock.

No knead bread HGH Hawaii1

5. Place the dough in the lightly greased pan, smooth side up.

6. Cover and let rise at room temperature for about 2 hours, until it’s become puffy. It should rise noticeably, but it’s not a real high-riser.

7. Using a sharp knife or lame, slash the bread in a crosshatch pattern. Place the lid on the pan, and put the bread in the cold oven. Set the oven temperature to 450°F, and put the bread into the oven.

8. Bake the bread for 45 to 50 minutes (start the timer when you place the bread into the cold oven). Remove the lid and continue to bake for another 5 to 15 minutes, until it’s deep brown in color, and a digital thermometer inserted into the center registers about 205°F.  

9. Remove the bread from the oven, turn it out onto a rack, and cool completely before slicing.

10. Store the bread, well wrapped, at room temperature for several days; freeze for longer storage.

The key to this recipe is a covered baking dish. We used a cast iron Dutch oven – this helps give the bread its unique crust.

The recipe is very forgiving. Leave it to rise for 8 hours or overnight. It’s the length of the rise that gives the bread its great taste, allowing it the time it needs to develop the richness of flavor.

We ate this bread with butter and lehua and cinnamon honey from Big Island Bees.

This no-knead bread recipe is by far the easiest bread we have ever baked. It gives you the best results for the least amount of effort – and no prior baking experience is necessary.

Let us know in the comments below how your bread turned out! Happy baking!

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All-in-one chocolate cake recipe

all in one chocolate cake hawaii horizon

What could be better than a chocolate cake that only takes minutes to prepare? This all-in-one chocolate cake recipe is super easy to assemble – simply fling all the ingredients into the food processor – and it tastes great thanks to the secret ingredient, canola oil! Check out our video and the full recipe below.

The recipe

1 Tbsp instant coffee granules
¾ cup water
2 cups white sugar
1¾ cups flour
¾ cup cocoa powder
2 tsp vanilla essence
2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
2 eggs
1¼ cups milk 
½ cup canola oil (or you could use sunflower oil)

 

1.  Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Grease and line a 9″ (23-25cm) springform cake pan with baking paper.
2.  Dissolve the coffee granules in water, then place all ingredients into a food processor and process until well combined and smooth.
3.  Pour the mixture into the cake tin. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 1 hour 20 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.
4.  Cool on a wire rack and when completely cold add your favorite chocolate frosting.

NOTE: the mixture is meant to be runny, so don’t worry! There is quite a lot of batter so make sure you’re using a decent sized food processor (we used an 11 cup).

all in one chocolate cake recipe kona hawaii

The key ingredient to this amazingly easy-to-make cake is the canola oil. Replacing the butter used in traditional chocolate cake recipes, the canola oil helps give the cake its moist consistency. 

TIP: After the cake has been baking for an hour monitor the cake every 10 minutes or so to check on its progress.

Don’t forget the whipped cream. We served our cake with cream but Greek yoghurt would work just as well.

We hope you enjoyed our chocolate cake recipe. We would love to hear how your cake turned out! Let us know in the comments below. 

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Springtime gardening on the Big Island

Spring is the perfect time to get organised with the vegetable garden here on the Big Island. We’ve turned the vegetable and herb gardens into special lockdown projects (no doubt like many of you) and have spent the last couple of weeks prepping the gardens for planting, raising and transplanting seedlings, and protecting our new plantings from outside invaders! (namely slugs…)

(Check back for updates! We’ll be updating this post as the garden grows. Click the links below to see our progress!)

Snap peas

We’ve grown snap peas in the past and they are always a delicious addition to the garden. First we started out by growing the seeds in individual pots, then we transplanted them to the garden beds. Peas were easily the quickest to grow from seed and grew noticeably every couple of days.

Before and after

It had been a while since we’d last grown peas and the garden bed was looking a little sad! It was time remove the weeds, pull out the wire frames and start again from scratch.

Before After

Then it was time to transplant. We managed to get four viable pea plants grown from seed. However, we lost two of these a couple of nights after planting due to an attack of slugs… 

Peas trellis 13:5 Horizon Guest House Big Island
Progress update May 13th

Lettuces, arugula, beets and radishes

Lettuces Big Island Gardening

We wanted to make sure we had a good variety in this garden so planted out lettuces, beets, arugula, radishes and spinach.

Lettuces Horizon B&B

Lettuces were slow to come through but finally the baby lettuces appeared!

Lettuce4 Horizon B&B Kona

Radishes quickly flourished from seed and most of what we planted grew. It wasn’t the same for the beets (only two grew from seed, bottom right in the photo) and only a couple of spinach plants came up (top left in the photo).

Progress updates:

Radishes 9:5 Horizon B&B Big Island
Lettuces/Radishes May 9th
Lettuce bed Horizon B&B Big Island 9:5
Lettuces/Radishes May 9th
Radishes 13:5 Horizon B&B Big Island Hawaii
Radishes May 13th
Beets 9:5 Horizon Guest House Big Island
Beets May 13th
Lettuces 22.5 Horizon BnB
Lettuces/Radishes May 22nd
Tomatillos 22.5 Horizon BnB
Tomatillos May 22nd

Herbs

Garden herbs Big Island Horizon

It was trial and error with the herb garden. Initially we planted basil, thyme and cilantro from seed but after 10 days… nothing appeared. We decided the fault was the age of the seeds (pro tip: if the seeds look like they’re ancient then they probably are and they probably won’t work). For our second attempt we decided to plant a mixture of seeds and small plants, just to give ourselves a head start. 

Herbs Horizon HGH

Basil, dill, cilantro, thyme and spearmint plants were planted, as well as seeds of dark basil, thyme, cilantro and sweet basil in the hope that the combination would yield some lasting results. But then disaster struck again! The same night the slugs made their appearance and decimated the transplanted peas they also launched an assault on our thyme and cilantro. We used citric acid to kill the slugs but in the process also terminally damaged the thyme and cilantro…

What is dark basil?

Dark opal basil is a basil variety created at the University of Connecticut in the 1950s. It has dark purple leaves and a stronger flavour than sweet basil.

Herbs 2 HGH Kona

Third time lucky! This time we replaced the damaged thyme and cilantro and used slug bait to form a defensive perimeter! This seems to have stopped the slugs for now.

Herbs Horizon Big Island

Progress updates:

Dark Basil 9:5 seedlings Horizon B&B
Dark Basil May 9th
Cilantro 9:5 Horizon B&B Big Island Hawaii
Cilantro May 9th
Cilantro 13:5 Horion B&B Big Island
Cilantro May 13th
Sweet Basil 22.5 Horizon Guest House Hawaii
Sweet Basil May 22nd

Pineapples

Pineapples B&B Horizon Guest House

We transplanted some smaller pineapple plants from another area of the property to this garden. In order to suppress weeds we had already covered unused beds with a ground cover. By slicing a series of cuts into the cover we were able to plant a row of pineapples and also continue to stop the weeds from returning.

Seedlings

We were also quite successful growing okra, peppers, tomatillo, yellow tomatillo and roma tomato seedlings. We started the seeds off in recycled fruit containers and then moved them to peat pots.

Seedlings Horizon B&B Kona
Step 1
Seedlings2 Horizon B&B Kona
Step 2
Seedlings Horizon B&B
Step 3

Moving the seedlings to peat pots was a delicate operation, especially for the okra and roma seedlings. They had to be carefully moved, and any roots untangled before planting.

Transplanting

And finally the seedlings were planted in the garden. Followed by a good watering and a measure of liquid fertilizer to help them on their way!

Seedlings Horizon Guest House
Transplant 2 Horizon B&b
Roma tomatoes

Progress updates:

Lima Beans 9:5 Horizon B&B Hawaii
Lima Beans May 9th
Lima Beans 22.5 Horizon Guest House
Lima Beans May 22nd
We’ll keep you updated on the garden as it (hopefully) flourishes! Have you found yourself in the vegetable garden more during the lockdown? What have you been planting?

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It’s a lockdown life: dispatches from the Big Island

ATV Horizon Kona Hawaii

It’s early spring and like much of the rest of the world we’re adjusting to life in lockdown. Tourists have all but fled and the residents are hunkering down as we all do our best on the Big Island to flatten the curve. Like the rest of you we’ve been grappling with the new normal here at Horizon, so we decided to turn our blog microscope to life behind the scenes at HGH.

On March 25 everyone in Hawaii was required to stay at home or in their place of residence. The next day the state of Hawaii mandated a quarantine period of 14 days for all visitors to the island. Cancellations came thick and fast. But while we might not have any guests due to the lockdown it doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of chores and projects to work on.

Coffee Clem HGH
The day always starts better with coffee!

Then on April 1, all persons traveling between any of the islands in the state of Hawaii became subject to mandatory self-quarantine.

Arrived just in time...

Meanwhile, thousands of miles to the south in New Zealand, Clem’s partner Angus was trying to get to Hawaii having just had his immigrant visa approved. After many flight changes, and frantic packing, Angus caught one of the last flights out of New Zealand before the government announced the country was going into lockdown.

Almost exactly four years after they first met, and after time spent in both countries, Angus arrived in Hawaii as a newly-minted permanent resident. 

Finally! It was time to get on with their lives together. Unfortunately, Angus arrived just before the lockdown was enforced. After careful deliberation it was decided it was sensible to quarantine, just to be on the safe side (luckily he was fine).

Clem & Angus
Angus and Clem, New Zealand, 2019

With contact not allowed (not even a hug!) and social distance mandated at all times, Clem whisked Angus back to Horizon and into 14 day quarantine.

Alone together was the new normal. At least for the following two weeks! But spring was in the air, the weather was good, and it was perfect timing for some landscape gardening. 

Around the house

Before After

First up, landscaping and weeding around the guest rooms. Garden maintenance is always done on a regular basis but with more time it was a great opportunity to tackle the bigger jobs.

Datura HGH Big Island Hawaii

Angus works on cutting back the overgrown datura to the level of the rock wall in front of the guest rooms. Hedges between the guest rooms are trimmed and sculpted. 

Datura Big Island Hawaii

After mowing the lawns it’s time to rake up the clippings.

Pro tip: use grass clippings to cover any sections of your lawn that are struggling.

Grass clippings are good for your lawn because they act like a natural fertilizer since they contain water and nutrients (like nitrogen) – all the good things to keep your lawn in a healthy state. Left on the lawn the clippings decompose and release water and nutrients back into the soil.

Pond Life

Pond Horizon Guest House B&B Hawaii HGH

Overgrown weeds cleared, and ferns cut back. The garden around the pond is weeded and the red anthuirums once again emerge, taking pride of place! 

Garden Hawaii Big Island Horizon HGH

Pineapples and lizards

Next, the pineapple grove. A good crop of pineapples has grown well in this part of the garden and with a harvest not to far away it was time to clear the dead branches from the papaya tree and get to pulling weeds.

Joining the gardening team was this little lizard. At first suspicious, it soon appeared to like hanging out with (and on) Clem! 

A visit to the upper pastures...

Sunny Horizon Guest House
Poncho and Sunny

Poncho & Lefty (the donkeys) and Sunny (the horse) were curious onlookers to all of this activity. A midday break for lunch and a visit with the gang was in order.

Next on the agenda, a change of pace – down the driveway to the warehouse.

Cleaning up around the warehouse

Rubbish run Horizon Guest House Hawaii B&B

Everyone accumulates clutter and Horizon is no different. The warehouse, on the lower slopes of the property, was in need of a spring clean and then a run to the refuse station down the highway for a rubbish drop off.

Recycling was also sorted. Cans, bottles and cardboard were put aside for a separate trip to the recycling plant in Kona.

Rubbish cleared. Check. Progress made. Check. Staying hydrated in the heat? Check.

Mowing and more mowing...

Rideon mower Horizon Guest House Hawaii HGH

Staying on top of all the mowing that needs to be done on the property is almost a full-time job. However, it’s made significantly easier by the use of both a ride-on mower and a tractor with a mower attachment – to tackle the rocky pastures that need to be cleared.

Fun fact: Wild Pigs. Normally cute, especially the piglets, wild pigs can cause havoc on the property. Whether rooting about in the garden devastating crops of bananas or pineapples – or anything remotely edible – pigs are tough to keep out (finding ingenious ways to dig under the boundary fences to get in). By keeping the pastures clear of long grass it makes it easier to hunt the pigs and protect the Horizon crops from being plundered.

Tractor closeup Horizon Guest House Hawaii B&B
Clem about to mow on the lower pastures

Whether with guests or without, a day at Horizon wouldn’t be complete without another sunset. Tools down, gloves off, and dinner watching the sun disappear over the Pacific Ocean on the Kona Coast. A pretty good reward for a day’s work keeping Horizon Guest House in shape. Look out for details on our spring planting in the vegetable and herb gardens in the next lockdown dispatch.

Sunset Horizon Guest House Kona Hawaii HGH
How have you been spending the lockdown? In the garden? Spring cleaning the house? Keeping busy with arts and crafts? Baking? Let us know what you’ve been up to in the comments below. We’d love to hear from you.

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Farmers Markets on the Kona Coast

Kona Farmers Market 1
Photo credit: alohadreams.com

Make time during your stay on the Big Island to experience the best of the island’s locally grown produce, and locally made arts and crafts. There are many farmers markets on the Big Island – check out our favorites on the Kona Coast.

1. The Kona Farmers Market

This market is located in central Kona near Kailua Bay. One of the busier markets on the Big Island with over 40 vendors, you’ll find a wide range of produce and goods – from locally grown fruit and vegetables to assorted arts and crafts.

Kona Farmers Market 2
Photo credit: https://bit.ly/3993dpc

You can also expect to find flowers and leis, locally made jewelry, wooden bowls and carvings, 100% Kona coffee, locally made soaps, shaved ice, locally made honey and even hand-blown glass (look out for the amazing glass blowing demonstrations).

When and where?

The Kona Farmers market operates from Wednesday to Sunday between 7 – 4pm near the corner of Ali’i Drive and Hualalai Road.

2. The Pure Kona Green Market

Pure Kona Market 3
Photo credit: lovebigisland.com

This popular market is committed to providing locally sourced produce and goods, and handmade arts and crafts – with a special emphasis on products that contribute to sustainable living. The market’s motto is ‘From the Land, by Our Hand’ and has grown rapidly over the last few years and now boasts 80 vendors.

Pure Kona Market 4
Photo credit: afar.com

Amongst the abundance of local produce, including Kona coffee, honey and macadamia nuts is a large contingent of local arts and crafts vendors. Food stalls and live music make this a great day out for everyone.

Hot tip: The Pure Kona Green Market is the closest farmers market to Horizon Guest House, making it a great place to stock up on fresh fruit, or even some vegetables if you decide to grill out by the pool.

Vendor profile: Big Island Moonbow Farms
Wai Meli honey 5
Photo credit: waimeli.com

This farm uses organic methods to produce their raw honey called Wai Meli. The honey is not heated or processed in any way. For more information about their honey and their process – waimeli.com

When and where?

The Pure Kona Green Market is held every Sunday from 9 – 2pm at the Amy Greenwell Botanical Gardens, 82-6188 Mamalahoa Highway, directly opposite the Manago Hotel in Captain Cook.

3. Ho’oulu Community Farmers Market

Ho'oulu Farmers Market 6
Photo credit: hooulufarmersmkt.com

The Ho’oulu Community Farmers Market has between 20 to 40 vendors selling everything from local produce, coffee and macadamia nuts to arts and crafts.

In order to support the local community the market has a strict policy that all materials and produce must come from the Big Island. You’ll find fresh produce, nuts, jams, jellies and sauces. So whether it’s lilikoi delicacies, organic honey, frozen fruit popsicles or fresh cold cut coconuts – it’s all available at this local market.

Ho'oulu Farmers Market 7
Photo credit: Sonia Martinez
When and where?

This market is held every Wednesday between 9 – 2pm at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa, Keauhou Bay, on the lawn beside Kaleiopapa Street.

4. Keauhou Farmers Market

Keauhou Farmers Market
Photo credit: lovebigisland.com

Held in the parking lot of the Keauhou Shopping Center, this is a small market with everything you need. Committed to selling only produce grown on the Big Island, you’ll find delicious honey, coffee, macadamia nuts, meat, eggs and fresh bread.  

Keauhou Farmers Market
Photo credit: afar.com

The Keauhou Farmers Market works with a number of local farm vendors to bring you the best in local quality produce.

Vendor profile: Earthly Delights Farm
EarthlyDelights-KeauhouFarmersMarket 8
Photo credit: keauhoufarmersmarket.com

Earthly Delights Farm – a certified organic farm, they produce Kona coffee, macadamia nuts, tropical fruit, Kona chocolate, tropical dried fruit and tropical pastries!

When and where?

Every Saturday between 8–12pm at the Keauhou Shopping Center in front of Ace Hardware, 78-6831 Ali’i Drive, Kona. 

Support 100% Big Island!

Visiting a farmers market during your stay is not only a great way to sample the delights of the Big island but it’s also a great way to support the local community. 

To make a reservation at Horizon Guest House click the Book Now button below.

Author: Angus Meek

Custom cycle tours on the Big Island of Hawaii

Cycle tour Big Island Hawaii Horizon B&B

Have you ever wanted to cycle the Big Island at your own pace? Ever wondered what it would be like to do a cycle tour without having to worry about your luggage? With a customized cycle tour you can do all of this as well as making Horizon Guest House a destination on your itinerary.

2 Cycle tour Arrival Horizon Guest House Hawaii

Lifecycle Adventures offers customized bicycle tours on the Big Island of Hawaii. They take care of all the logistics, transporting your luggage to your destination while you enjoy the day’s cycle route. A support van is always close by if you need anything.

Cycle tour arrival Horizon Guest House Hawaii
Bruno, Lifecycle Adventures host

Lifecycle are operated by locals who live and cycle on the island. Bruno will take care of all your cycling needs, and help plan the best cycle itinerary to meet your ability.

Cycle tour arrival luggage Horizon Guest House Hawaii

Enjoy the cycle ride and relax in the knowledge that your luggage will arrive safely at your destination.

Janet Michael Nancy David
Janet, Michael, Nancy and David

Our most recent Lifecycle Adventurers. Their itinerary included a route down the Kona Coast from Waikaloa.

Dinner with a view

Cycle tour dinner prep Horizon Guest House

After a day out on the bicycle what could be better than grilling out by the pool. If you’d rather not eat out, Horizon Guest House has everything you need to make dinner. This option is perfect if you’ve spent the day cycling to Horizon and would rather sit back with a glass of wine.

Cycle tour dinner Horizon Guest House

On tour

Cycle tour cycle day Horizon Guest House
Returning to Horizon

This touring group stayed two nights and cycled down to Two Steps on day two. Cycling the Big Island is all about the variation in both climate and landscapes. Whether it’s the white sand beaches north of Kona, the coffee country and sweeping vistas of South Kona, or the mint-green hill country around Waimea, a cycle tour is a great way to see the island.

Photo credit: David Goldbloom

Spend the day out on the bicycle and return to Horizon to soak in the views from your guest room lanai.

Cycle tour animals Horizon B&B Kona
David feeding Poncho

Make sure you leave time on your cycle tour to visit with the Horizon farm animals. Clem always has snacks on hand for Poncho and Lefty (the donkeys), and Sunny (the horse).

Cycle tour animals B&B Horizon Kona
Michael and David admiring Sunny

Cycling tours are available year round, starting or ending in either Waikoloa or Kona. Tour length is typically between 3 to 10 days. There are two types of tours – self-guided or guided.

On a self-guided tour the local guide will organize your transfers, luggage delivery, and will also be on call for any help in the event of flat tires or mechanical problems.

On a guided tour the local guide will explore a destination with you and a support vehicle will be available at all times.

Cycle tour animals Horizon B&B Kona
Sunny loves to be feed and brushed.
Cycle tour Horizon B&B Kona
Photo credit: David Goldbloom

Day two

Cycle tour dinner Horizon Guest House Kona
Nancy and Janet

The tour group preparing dinner and enjoying another amazing Kona Coast sunset.

20 Cycle tour Nancy and Michael Horizon GH
Nancy and Michael

Photo credit: David Goldbloom

Dinner by candlelight...

Cycle tour final photo Horizon B&B
Photo credit: David Goldbloom

Enjoy the best of the Big Island at a slower pace with a custom cycle tour on the Kona Coast. 

For more information about Lifecycle Adventures https://www.lifecycleadventures.com/hawaii-bike-tours/ 

For more information on cycling on the Big Island check out our blog post https://horizonguesthouse.com/2019/10/12/the-horizon-bicycle-diaries/ 

Special thanks to Bruno at Lifecycle Adventures, and to David for supplying some amazing photos.

To make a reservation at Horizon Guest House click the Book Now button below.

To Grill or Not to Grill?

South Kona has many great restaurants, from casual to fine dining, but sometimes, at the end of a long day of adventures on the Big Island, staying in and grilling out sounds even better.

At Horizon Guest House we offer an alternative to restaurant dining – our very own BBQ area. Located right next to the infinity pool, our BBQ area is complete with everything you need. We have a large gas BBQ, an ample-sized bench area for food preparation, a working sink, and all the dishes, flatware and cooking utensils you could need.

Give yourself a break from the restaurant routine

Nothing is better than a home-cooked meal. Here at Horizon you can enjoy everything a traditional bed and breakfast has to offer as well as the ability to cook out. Make the most of produce from local farmers markets, locally sourced meat and seafood, and grill your choice of steak, chicken or fish on our BBQ.

Grill with a view

Enjoy your meal at one of the nearby tables overlooking the pool and the Kona Coast. Toast the sunset at the end of the day, safe in the knowledge that you can have a drink without worrying about having to drive – your room awaits only a short walk away.

Not just dinner

Fancy a lazy afternoon BBQ by the pool? Use the poolside kitchen area to make lunch as well. All guest rooms have their own refrigerator and guests are welcome to use the much larger shared refrigerator in the guest utility room.

Horizon Guest House laundry Big Island Hawaii
Utility room with guest refrigerator

The guest refrigerator is the perfect place to store all the groceries you need for your lunch or dinner creation. The poolside kitchen area is already stocked with a basic set of utensils but let Clem know if there’s something else you need for the meal you have planned – he’s more than happy to help make your lunch or dinner unforgettable.

Tip: Don’t hesitate to buy that bottle of wine – we have wine glasses you can use, and of course an ice cold refrigerator to keep it chilled.

Where to shop

Now you’ve decided to grill out, so where should you shop? Let us help. Below is a list of local stores, beginning near the airport and heading south toward Horizon Guest House. Most are on Highway 11 or a short distance down a side road.

1. Costco

Costco Kona Hawaii
Photo credit: https://bit.ly/36ro31a

Familiar to all Americans, Costco has everything you need. For non-residents, please be aware you will need to be a Costco member to shop here. Only 12 minutes, or 4.6 miles, from the Kona Airport. Hours: Mon – Fri 10:00am – 8:30pm, Sat 9:30am – 6:00pm, Sun 10:00am – 6:00pm. More details https://www.costco.com/warehouse-locations/kailua-kona-HI-140.html

2. Safeway

Safeway Kona Big Island Hawaii Horizon Guest House
Photo credit: https://bit.ly/37ARcbG

No membership necessary. Great all-purpose grocery store. Located on Henry Street, just above Wal-Mart and about 500 feet from Highway 11. Open 24 hours. https://bit.ly/2t3FIOM 

3. Kona Butcher Shop

Kona Butcher Shop Kona Big Island Hawaii
Photo credit: https://bit.ly/36oVqS8

New to Kona, this butcher shop opened just last year and supplies locally sourced meat and seafood. Hours: Tues – Fri 10:30am – 6pm and Sat – Mon 11am – 5pm. http://konabutchershop.com

4. ChoiceMART

ChoiceMart Captain Cook Hawaii
Photo credit: https://bit.ly/37wkg3P

Less than 10 miles from Horizon Guest House, and often called ‘our country mini Safeway’, it stocks a great variety of groceries, a good selection of produce and has a new seafood deli section. https://www.choicemarthawaii.com

Added bonus – Kona Brewery is on tap. Purchase a growler (jug) of your favorite Kona Brew. https://konabrewingco.com

So why not take advantage of something that few B&Bs offer – outdoor kitchen facilities – and enjoy a homemade meal beside the pool with the magnificent Kona Coast as your backdrop.

To make a reservation at Horizon Guest House click the Book Now button below.

Author: Angus Meek

The Kona Street Market & Sunset Saturdays

Kokoua Village Stroll Kona Street Market
Photo credit: www.historickailuavillage.com

For one Sunday afternoon every month Ali’i Drive in Kailua-Kona’s historic village is closed for traffic and the street transformed into a vibrant, pedestrian-only marketplace. The Kona street market is known as the Kokua Kailua Village Stroll and makes for a great way to shop, dine and buy locally made produce – all while supporting a special community event.

Kona Stroll Big Island Hawaii
Photo credit: www.bigislandguide.com

When is it?

The Kona Stroll is held on the third Sunday of every month between 1–6pm. This year the dates for the Kona street market are as follows:

Kona Stroll 2020

January 19, February 16, March 15, Saturday, April 4 coincides with Hawaiian Mission Bicentennial celebration, May 17, June 14, July 19, August 16, September 20, October 18, November 15, December 13.

Kailua-Kona Stroll Big Island Hawaii Kona Street Market
Photo credit: www.bigislandguide.com

Where is it?

75-5677 Ali’i Drive. This stretch of Ali’i Drive runs along the waterfront in Kailua-Kona’s historic village. This picturesque location, overlooking Kailua Bay, gives locals and tourists alike the opportunity to stroll the marketplace, as well as adjoining shops and restaurants.

What to expect at the Kona Street Market

Stalls sell a range of merchandise including koa wood products, natural oils, and plenty of other homemade creations – including jams and chutneys. There are also food stalls and arts and craft sellers.

 

Fun fact: Kokua is a Hawaiian word that means to help others. In this context it encompasses the idea of helping others in the community by giving your time. Think of your stroll amongst the marketplace as a way to help support the local community.

Kona Street Market
Photo credits: www.historickailuavillage.com

An Afternoon at Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihee Palace Kona Street Market
Photo credit: www.wheretraveler.com

In the heart of Kailua-Kona’s historic village is Hulihe’e Palace. Originally built as a vacation home for Hawaiian royalty in 1838, the palace is used today to showcase Victorian-era artifacts from the reign of King Kalākaua and Queen Kapi’olani. Also on show – koa wood furniture, portraits, kapa*, feather work, Hawaiian quilts and other royal artifacts.

On the same Sunday as the scheduled Kona Stroll the palace holds an ‘Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace’ – a festive cultural afternoon with hula and mele (chants, songs or poems). This is a great way to experience local Hawaiian culture – suitable for the whole family.

Hulihee Palace Kona Coast Big Island Street Market
Photo credit: www.bigislandguide.com

The concert, held on the palace lawns, features free music and performances from the Hulihe’e Palace Band and the Merrie Monarchs Chorale as they perform traditional and modern Hawaiian music. The music starts from 4pm.

Did you know? *Kapa is the Hawaiian word for barkcloth. Usually made out of paper mulberry, hibiscus or even breadfruit bark, Hawaiian kapa is different. Hawaiians use a watermark to decorate kapa. These watermarks are small designs that can be seen clearly when the kapa is held up to the light. Kapa was often used for clothing, or even bed covers for those lucky enough to be of a chiefly caste.

For more information on this fascinating subject: https://www.mauimagazine.net/beauty-in-the-bark/

Missed the Kona Stroll?

Hawaiian Sunset Saturdays
Photo credit: www.thisweekhawaii.com

If you missed the stroll why not head along to another great free event held on Ali’i Drive in the historic village. Hawaiian Sunset Saturdays is held on the last Saturday of every month from 5:30pm to 6:30pm. This community event is a great way to celebrate the amazing Big Island sunsets with live music and hula.

Bring a beach blanket or a lawn chair and enjoy the view.

Where? The lawn at Coconut Grove Marketplace, 75-5809 Ali’i Drive.

To see a complete listing of all the dates for the Kokua Kailua Village Stroll and Hawaiian Sunset Saturdays, download the PDF here.

Hawaiian Sunset Saturdays Kona Big Island Hawaii
Photo credit: www.thisweekhawaii.com

To make a reservation at Horizon Guest House click the Book Now button below.

Author: Angus Meek

Manta Ray Diving on the Kona Coast

Manta Ray Kona Hawaii Big Island Horizon B&B
Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

The Big Island of Hawaii is famous for many things but perhaps one of the most popular and unique attractions is the manta ray night dive. Don’t worry if you’re not a certified diver – snorkelers can still experience the thrill of being close to these majestic creatures.

Why are manta rays so special?

The manta rays inhabiting the Kona Coast are reef manta rays, one of the largest species of manta rays in the world. These amazing creatures can grow in size to anywhere between 12 and 18 feet. Life expectancy can be anywhere up to 50 years.

Manta rays are filter feeders – they survive on plankton. By gliding through the ocean with their giant mouths open they filter the plankton out of the water. The reef manta rays are so-called because they prefer to stay close to the coast of the Hawaiian islands.

Did you know? Manta rays derive their name from the Portuguese and Spanish word for ‘mantle’ which is a blanket-shaped trap historically used to catch this type of fish.

Manta Ray Night Diving Kona B&B Horizon
Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Why night dive with the mantas?

A night dive with mantas is essential in order to see these great creatures up close. Their prey, the plankton, are light sensitive and are drawn to the glow of dive flashlights – providing a perfect meal for the manta rays.

This creates the perfect environment for a close encounter with the mantas. If you choose to scuba you will be weighted so that you can sit comfortably on the sea floor around a collection of dive lights, a kind of ‘campfire’, while the mantas circle above – almost like a scene out of ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’.

If you choose to snorkel you’ll have a very similar experience at approximately 30 feet above. Snorkelers gather around a floating raft with bright lights that also attract the mantas. The dive itself lasts for approximately 45-60 minutes. The mantas will swim very close, but don’t worry they’re too focused on enjoying their meal to worry about you!

Fun fact: Don’t be afraid! The manta rays are large but harmless. They do not have stingers, barbs or teeth.

Where are the mantas?

There are two principal dive sites. The main dive site is near the Kona Airport runway, about a 25-30 minute boat trip from Honokohau Harbor. In this location there can be as many as two dozen mantas congregating during a night dive. The other, less well-known site is near the Sheraton Hotel in Keauhou Bay.

Several companies run charters out to these dive sites – we recommend Big Island Divers https://bigislanddivers.com/

Did you know? In Hawaii the manta rays are a protected species – it is illegal to hunt or fish them. Hawaiian mythology depicts the manta as catching the setting sun in their mouths before swimming to the other side of the island to deliver the sunrise. Find out more about manta ray preservation and protection from Manta Ray Advocates https://mantarayadvocates.com

What else might I see when diving on the Kona Coast?

Open Ocean Ray Kona Hawaii Horizon Guest House
Open ocean manta - Chill Ray / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

While it’s almost guaranteed* that you’ll see reef mantas during the night dive, there’s plenty to see during the day too. If you’re lucky you might see the pelagic or open ocean manta. I was lucky enough to spot one (see above), an individual that had never been photographed before.

*Big Island Divers offer either a 50% discount on a seat for another manta charter, or a 100% discount on standby availability seats for another one-tank manta charter, if no mantas are seen during a dive.

Did you know? Mantas, like humpbacks, have individual markings. These markings are catalogued by marine biologists. Let me know if you see the manta I photographed – it’s officially named ‘Chill Ray’.

Open Ocean Ray Chill Ray Kona B&B Horizon
Open ocean manta - Chill Ray / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Whether scuba or snorkeling you’ll see plenty of yellow tang (a surgeon fish).

Yellow tang Kona Hawaii Horizon Guest House
Yellow tang / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Almost as equally prevalent is the raccoon butterfly fish.

Raccoon butterfly fish
Raccoon butterfly fish / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Don’t forget the turtle! An encounter with a sea turtle is an unforgettable experience.

Sea turtle Kona Hawaii Big Island
Sea turtle / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

When scuba diving at the Kona Airport dive site you may encounter Hawaiian garden eels. These eels rise out of the sand to feed but keep part of their body in their burrow in order to instantly pop back down when threatened.

Anthias damsel fish Kona Hawaii Big Island
Bi-color anthias and black and white damsel fish with Hawaiian garden eels in the background / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

There is also plenty of cave diving on the Kona Coast – some near the manta dive sites. Here you’re likely to see fish that feed at night like the menpachi, see below.

Menpachi Kona Hawaii Big Island Horizon B&B
Menpachi with a solitary cleaner wrasse / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

You may also see soft coral on cave ceilings and walls.

Soft Coral Kona Hawaii
Soft coral / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

If you’re lucky you might even see a ‘ruby’ among the coral – a flame angelfish.

Flame angelfish Kona Hawaii
Flame angelfish with kole surgeon / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Count yourself extremely lucky if you spot our endangered monk seal. Rarely seen anymore, but it’s still possible.

Monk Seal Kona Hawaii Horizon Guest House
Monk seal / Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

Don’t forget to book your dive trip early – the manta ray dives and snorkel tours can book up fast.

To make a reservation at Horizon Guest House click the Book Now button below.

Author: Angus Meek