Snorkeling Kahalu’u Beach Park

Kahaluu-bay Kona 2
Photo credit: lovebigisland.com

Kahalu’u Beach Park is one the most popular snorkeling spots on the Big Island of Hawaii. While we recommend Two Step and Kealakekua Bay as two of the best, Kahaluʻu Bay has its own charm.

The beach park is located in calm water only minutes drive south of Kailua-Kona. Its easy location makes it the perfect place to snorkel if you are staying near Ali’i Drive, or in one of the hotels around the waterfront.

Kahaluu-Bay-Aerial_Please-Credit-The-Keeper-of-Bay-Production-resized
Photo credit: Kahalu‘u Bay Education Center

The bay itself is well-protected by a fringing reef, providing safe, calm waters for your snorkeling adventure. The water is relatively shallow, at about 4-5 feet deep. Green sea turtles are often seen in the bay as they like to sun themselves on the rocks.

Some of the sea life you might see when snorkeling include: sea urchins, octopus, eels, turtles, and of course plenty of tropical fish such as yellow tang, parrotfish, rainbow fish, and more.

hawaii-snorkeling-at-kahaluu-beach-park-big-island
Photo credit: wanderwisdom.com

Take care to snorkel in the south part of the bay. Traditionally, the north part of the bay is where surfers congregate. But there’s plenty of room for snorkelers and surfers alike! 

Free parking is available at the beach park. There are also picnic tables, showers and bathrooms, and snorkel rentals. Lifeguards are on duty from 9:30am–4:45pm every day.

Keep in mind that this is a very popular snorkeling destination because of its accessibility to downtown Kona. During the busy season (Nov-Mar) it can get crowded. Your best strategy is to arrive as early as possible to avoid the crowds. The ocean will be at its most calm first thing in the morning before the wind changes to onshore. 

The best snorkeling is found in the cove directly out from where you first enter the water. The water is a little clearer further out, due to the fresh groundwater that comes up through the sand near the shoreline causing a blurry effect in the water.

Photo credit: paradiseinhawaii.com

When the tide goes out there are plenty of shallow tide pools to explore in amongst the rocks. The park also has large pavilions for added shade and the beach park is the perfect place to bring a picnic lunch. Don’t have a car? The beach park is close enough to Kailua-Kona you can walk to it (if you’re staying nearby), cycle to it, or make use of the Kona Trolley! 

If your stay on the Big Island is limited then a short trip to Kahaluʻu Beach Park for snorkeling is well worth it. Make sure you get there early to avoid the crowds, and before the parking lot begins to fill up! 

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Key Lime Pie with Almond Macadamia Nut Crust

Key Lime Pie is a classic and we decided to make it with a twist! We had some guests that were gluten-free so the challenge was to create a tasty crust without the gluten. The answer was a combination of almond flour and roasted ground macadamia nuts.

The Key Lime Pie filling recipe is courtesy of Vaughn Vreeland at The New York Times.

Ingredients

FOR THE CRUST

    • 6 oz macadamia nuts
    • 1 cup almond flour
    • A pinch of salt
    • 1/3 cup of sugar
    • 2/3 of a stick of butter

FOR THE FILLING

    • 1(14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
    • 3 large egg yolks
    • 1 tablespoon fresh finely grated Key lime zest and ½ cup juice*
    • ½ teaspoon kosher salt (such as Diamond Crystal), or ¼ teaspoon table salt

Instructions

Heat oven to 325 degrees. Prepare the crust: Lightly roast the macadamia nuts [300 degrees for about 10 minutes] – grind up using Cuisinart. Add almond flout, pinch of salt, 1/3 cup regular sugar and pulse to combine. Add 2/3 of a stick of melted butter and pulse to combine.

Turn out into a pie or tart pan (I used a tart pan with removable bottom) and press to even out bottom and sides. Use a square sided measuring cup to help smooth it out.

Bake the crust for 15 minutes, until the color begins to deepen slightly. Cool completely.

While the crust cools, prepare the filling: In a medium bowl, whisk together the sweetened condensed milk, yolks, lime zest and salt. Add the lime juice and whisk until evenly combined and noticeably thicker, about 1 minute.

*I juiced one lemon first into the measuring cup, then juiced the balance from regular limes to make the 1/2 cup of juice. The zest was only from the limes.

(You may be tempted to prepare the curd in advance, but don’t do so more than 5 minutes before baking, as the lime juice may cause the mixture to curdle.)

Pour the filling into the cooled crust and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the curd is set at the edges and slightly jiggly in the middle. Transfer to a rack to cool completely at room temperature, about 1 hour, then cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours and up to overnight.

We hope you enjoyed making this delicious twist on the classic Key Lime Pie!

How did your pie turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Rambutan on the Big Island

The Rambutan has an unusual, almost alien-like appearance, with its bright red skin and numerous red pliable spines. But this fruit hides a delicious flesh inside and is definitely one to try during your Big Island stay. 

Where did the rambutan come from?

The rambutan is not endemic to Hawaii. The fruit is native to Southeast Asia and is a relative of the lychee, longan and mamoncillo. The name rambutan comes from the Malay-Indonesian word for hair ‘rambut’, due to the fruit being covered in hair-like spines.

The rambutan

The rambutan tree is an evergreen tree that can grow to almost 80 ft. The fruit range in size from 1-2.5 inches in length. The flesh of the fruit is translucent and contains a single seed. The rambutan is eaten raw by simply cutting open and then extracting the flesh inside (you can also pull apart the skin from the middle if you don’t have a knife). The entire fruit can also be cooked and even the seed is edible.

The flesh itself is sweet and fragrant with a floral flavor. The flesh is jelly-like in consistency and is super healthy, containing vitamin C, iron and potassium. It’s often used in desserts, like sorbets and puddings as well as in curries and other savory dishes. Their shelf-life is short and they are often made into jams and jellies.

You will often find rambutan at farmers markets rather than at your local grocery store as the fruit themselves don’t travel well. Like lychee, they are even better when chilled before eating.

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Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars

Pumpkin flavored treats are comfort food this time of year. The pumpkin chocolate chip cookie bars are easy to make and perfect for Halloween, or as a treat with your morning coffee. The key is not to overwork the dough as this can change the consistency of the cookie bar.

This recipe is courtesy of Jesse Szewczyk at The New York Times.

Ingredients

¾ cup/170 grams unsalted butter (1½ sticks)
Nonstick cooking spray or neutral oil
1¾ cups/385 grams packed light brown sugar
¾ cup/170 grams canned pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2½ cups/320 grams all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
1½ cups/9 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate chips

Instructions

In a saucepan, melt the butter over a medium heat. Continue cooking, stirring continuously to prevent the milk solids from burning. Stir until the butter foams, darkens to a light amber color and becomes fragrant and nutty, approx. 3 to 4 minutes more (be careful that the butter doesn’t burn). 

Pour the butter along with any of the browned milk solids into a large heatproof mixing bowl. Let cool for 20 minutes until warm, not hot.

Heat the oven to 325F. Grease a 9-by-13-inch metal or glass baking pan with cooking spray or oil. Line with a piece of parchment paper that hangs over the two long sides to create a kind of sling.

Add the brown sugar, pumpkin purée and vanilla extract to the cooled butter and whisk until smooth and glossy.

Add the flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, salt, ginger, cloves and nutmeg (you can substitute pumpkin spice if you don’t have cloves and nutmeg).

Stir with a spatula until a soft dough forms with no patches of unincorporated flour. (Be careful not to overmix).

Add 1 ¼ cups/216 grams of the chocolate chips and stir, taking care to evenly distribute throughout the dough.

Transfer the dough to the baking pan and press into an even layer using a spatula or clean hands coated with nonstick spray or oil. Sprinkle the top with the remaining chocolate chips – press them in so they stick.

Bake until the bars are puffed and the top is lightly browned. A skewer or a knife inserted into the center should come out clean with just a few crumbs attached. Bake for 30 to 45 minutes.

Let the bars cool in the pan on a wire rack for at least 1 hour. Using the parchment paper, lift the bars out of the pan and cut into 24 squares.

You can keep the cookie bars in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days.

We hope you enjoyed making this Halloween-inspired treat!

How did your cookie bars turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Essential Big Island: Two Step snorkeling

The Big Island has some of the best snorkeling in the state of Hawaii. Two Step is one of those places (along with nearby Kealakekua Bay). We recommend you don’t miss out on this amazing snorkeling spot.

South Kona is perhaps most famous for coffee and snorkeling. Both Two Step and Kealakekua Bay have some of the best snorkeling on the island and in the entire state. Two Step is especially popular because it’s easy to get to and even easier to jump straight into the ocean and start snorkeling.

Two Step Hawaii
Photo credit: bigislanddivers.com

Two Step is the name of the beach and also the name of the two naturally occurring steps inset into the rock at the ocean’s edge. These steps are where you enter the water. It can get crowded at peak times, so we recommend getting to Two Step as early as possible. This way you will beat the crowds and also take advantage of the calm ocean surface which is best for snorkeling. Alternatively, the end of the day can be a less crowded time to go snorkeling too.

You will find parking right at the beach itself but keep in mind this fills up quickly. On the opposite side of the road is paid parking. There is more free parking on the side of the road which approaches the National Park next to Two Step. If you park here it’s just a two minute walk down to the beach. You can also park in the National Park itself.

Entering the water is easy because of the two naturally-formed lava steps (hence the name two step). It’s mostly lava here, and there isn’t much sand. But the snorkeling is easy and there are no currents, making it a perfect place for beginners to try snorkeling. We recommend using a flotation device (either a belt, or even a boogie board) if you feel apprehensive about being in deep water (10-15 feet). Using a boogie board is a great way to simply relax and concentrate on observing the marine life.

Photo credit: Bigislandguide.com

Two Step is popular with local residents and tourists alike. Despite the lack of sand there is still shade and it makes a nice location to set up a beach chair and relax by the ocean. There is also a shallow bay to the left of the boat ramp that serves as a safe place for children to swim, or adults who aren’t confident in deeper water.

Two Step is one of the jewels of South Kona. You’ll see plenty of fish including yellow tang, butterflyfish, eel, parrotfish, and puffer fish, to name a few. You might even see dolphins and the occasional turtle. Keep in mind it’s now illegal to swim with spinner dolphins. A distance of at least 50 yards must be maintained at all times.

There are limited facilities at Two Step. There are porta potty restrooms, but no showers. There are also a few picnic tables.

Two Step is definitely an essential stop on your Big Island journey. Whether you’re a seasoned snorkeler or just a beginner, there is something for everyone at South Kona’s celebrated snorkeling spot.

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Clem’s Banoffee Pie

Banoffee Pie is a classic British dessert consisting of layers of caramel, banana and cream. Our variation reduces the amount of caramel and adds a layer of chocolate ganache. If you haven’t tried this pie before you’re going to love it! Caramel, banana and cream (and now chocolate) is a winning combination.

Ingredients

14 oz sweetened condensed milk
14 graham crackers
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
nonstick cooking spray
1 ½ cups heavy cream
1 tablespoon sugar
3 bananas, sliced

Chocolate ganache layer
½ cup heavy cream
1 cup of chocolate chips

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400˚F (200˚C). Pour the sweetened condensed milk into a baking dish. Cover with aluminum foil and put in a larger baking dish. Fill the larger dish with hot water until it reaches halfway up the sides of the smaller dish. This technique is known as Bain-marie.

Place in the oven and bake for 90 minutes. Check the water level every so often, making sure that it reaches halfway and refilling as necessary. Carefully remove the baking dish from the hot water bath and let cool to room temperature.

Whisk the mixture (now it’s become dulce de leche!) until smooth.

Note: you can make dulce de leche by heating the whole can of sweetened condensed milk using an Instapot. Make sure you follow the instructions to do so carefully. Find out more: https://apressurecookerkitchen.com/condensed-milk-dulce-de-leche/

Reduce the oven temperature to 350˚F (180˚C). In the bowl of a food processor, combine the graham crackers and melted butter. Pulse until crackers are finely ground and the mixture has the consistency of wet sand.

Grease a 9-inch (22 cm) tart pan with nonstick spray. Add the graham cracker mixture to the tin and press evenly to cover pan.

Bake crust for 5 minutes, until golden. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool to room temperature.

Spread the dulce de leche inside the tart crust, using a spatula to smooth it into an even layer.

In a small bowl mix together cream and chocolate chips for the ganache. Microwave for 1 minute on high, stir, and then microwave on high for another 30 seconds. 

Whisk until it forms a shiny ganache.

Spread the chocolate ganache carefully on top of the dulce de leche layer.

Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight, until set.

In a large bowl, beat the heavy cream until soft peaks begin to form. Add the sugar and beat until soft peaks form.

Remove the pie from the refrigerator. Place the banana slices over the chocolate layer. Top with the whipped cream, spreading evenly to cover bananas. Serve!

We hope you enjoyed our variation on the classic banoffee pie! Enjoy!

How did your pie turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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Essential Big Island: Making the most of Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea

Essential Big Island is a series of blogs focused on sites or attractions that are a must-see for any visitor to the island.

Visiting the summit of Mauna Kea is spectacular – whether you do so for the sunrise, or the sunset. We recommend the sunset! Make the most of your visit to Mauna Kea with our guide on how to structure your mountain visit.

It’s important to plan out your itinerary carefully. You’ll want to arrive at the Visitor Information Station in good time before sunset. We recommend allowing 30 minutes to drive up from the information station, and about an hour prior to that to acclimatize to the altitude.

For example, if sunset is 7pm and you’re staying in Kona, then you should leave Kona at about 4pm and you’ll arrive at the Visitor Information Station at about 5:30pm. Acclimatize at the information station for about one hour and then leave for the summit at 6:30pm.

It’s always better to allow more time! There are rangers on site who will check to make sure you have enough fuel and are driving a 4WD vehicle before you head up. 

Magnificent Mauna Kea

The summit of the mountain was believed to be the meeting place of the Earth Mother, Papahānaumoku, and the Sky Father, Wākea, and Mauna Kea is considered to be sacred. 

Ancient Hawaiians tracked the position of the stars and understood how this related to navigation. They are thought to have used observation platforms on the summit containing stones that were used to mark the positions of the rising and setting stars.

The summit of Mauna Kea is 13,796 ft. (4,205 mts) high. But the mountain extends about 19,700 ft. (6000 mts.) below the surface of the water, making it the tallest mountain in the world from its base. The Visitor Information Station is at 9,200 ft. (2,804 mts.) and this is where you will need to acclimatize for about an hour before ascending to the summit. 

Mauna Kea telescopes

Mauna Kea telescopes
From left, the 8-meter Subaru (Japan), the twin 10-meter Keck I and II (California) and the 3-meter NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Photo credit: Babak Tafreshi / National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

The summit of the mountain contains almost perfect conditions for viewing the stars. These include dry clear air, low temperatures, low turbulence, excellent visibility, and almost no light pollution.

Mauna Kea sunset
Mauna Kea at sunset. Photo credit: Horizon Guest House

A Trip to the summit

First, you’ll need a 4WD vehicle. If not, there are some great tours available. Then, check the conditions on the mountain by calling (808) 935 6268. There’s a pre-recorded message of the conditions and any warnings. Then you’re good to go!

Start off your journey to the summit of Mauna Kea like any good road trip – with snacks, or even better, a complete meal. We set off on a weekday after stopping at Safeway for supplies. 

We recommend picking up a light to-go meal that travels well. Take a cooler if you can. Safeway in Kona has a great selection of ready-made meals – including salads, sandwiches and sushi.

You might crave sugar at high altitude – we recommend bringing some dark chocolate!

The road out of Kona. Make sure you’ve packed warm clothes, including jackets. If you think you might struggle at high altitude you can purchase small bottles of oxygen from Longs Drug Store (CVS). We took a couple of bottle just in case.

On the Saddle Road heading to the mountain.

Don’t forget there’s a restroom stop on the way to the mountain. The Gilbert Kahele Recreation Area is located about 15 minutes before the Visitor Information Station (there are often lines at the bathroom at the Information Station, so we recommend stopping here if you need to).

It’s a beautiful scenic drive up to the Visitor Information Station.

The Visitor Information Station with the summit of Mauna Kea in the distance. The station includes information about the mountain and a small gift shop.

Dormitories that house the support staff for the telescopes are located near the information station.

Time to eat our to-go meals. Everything tastes better at altitude – especially chocolate!

You might see some local wildlife like this pheasant.

The bulk of the road from the information station to the summit is unpaved. Hang on, it can get a little bumpy! But the spectacular views of the Mars-like landscape are worth it.

The last section of the road is actually paved. The summit is close!

Just in time for sunset. Take care when you get out of the car – the high altitude affects everyone differently.

Make sure to check out the view in the other direction. The mountain casts an incredible shadow.

You won’t be able to stay up on the mountain much longer than 30 minutes after sunset. The rangers like to get everyone down relatively quickly in order to reduce light pollution from car headlights. It also makes for an easier drive back home if you can avoid the line of traffic back down the mountain.

The summit of Mauna Kea is an absolute must-visit attraction. If you haven’t rented a 4WD vehicle then it is worth booking a tour (they’ll pick you up and drop you back in Kona).

Don’t forget you can spend more time after sunset at the Visitor Information Station (the gift shop stays open until 9pm) to simply gaze at the amazing night sky!

Author: Angus Meek

Essential Big Island: Pu’uhonua o Hōnaunau Place of Refuge

Essential Big Island is a series of blogs focused on sites or attractions that are a must-see for any visitor to the island.

Pu’uhonua o Honaunau, or Place of Refuge, is a National Historical Park of great significance to the island and to the state of Hawaii. From history to architecture, this is absolutely an essential stop on your Hawaii experience!

Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park is located in South Kona. Take Mamalahoa Highway (Hwy. 11) to Ke Ala o Keawe Road (Hwy. 160) – between mile markers 103 and 104 (the Honaunau Post Office is on the corner). Follow Hwy. 160 all the way down to the entrance at the bottom of the hill. The park is open daily 8:30am-4:30pm. Make sure you pick up a free brochure just outside the gift shop before you enter the park. The brochure includes a detailed, easy-to-follow map of the park. 

There is plenty of parking inside the park and a well-stocked gift shop.

What happened at Place of Refuge?

Kapu, or the laws that Hawaiians adhered too, could be violated in a number of different ways. These included when a woman eats with a man, a fish is caught out of season, or even when a commoner’s shadow falls on an ali’i.

Penalties for these types of crimes were harsh. You could face the death penalty, in which case your only recourse was to escape your captors on foot, find your way to the coast, and then swim to the Place of Refuge (the area of land bordered by the Great Wall and the edge of the coastline). Once there you could seek to be absolved by the priest for your crime.

Stop by the amphitheater to watch a film about the park

Royal grounds

The Royal Grounds were the primary gathering place for local chiefs. Here was where they would meet, hold ceremonies and negotiate during wartime. They also took part in games such as kōnane (a board game). Here is also where priests were consulted by the chiefs when guidance was required.  

The Royal Grounds with the Hālau wa’a (canoe house) in the background.

Hālau wa’a (canoe house).

Looking toward Two Step, a popular snorkeling spot.

Kōnane is a strategy game played with black and white pebbles on a stone playing surface called a papamū.

The Great Wall

The Great Wall is up to 12 feet in height, 18 feet wide and over 950 feet in length. Constructed over 400 years ago, the wall was built using dry-set masonry – a technique in which stones are placed without mortar.

Hale o Keawe

In ancient Hawaii the Royal Grounds were believed to be the center of power. The grounds contain the main temple (heiau), above, where the bones of many chiefs (ali’i) were buried. The temple retained a special kind of spiritual power, known as mana

Pahoehoe lava – a type of lava that is characterized by a smooth, billowy surface.
 

The Royal Fish Ponds

These ponds held fish that were to be eaten only by the ali’i.

The 1871 to Ki’ilae Village. The ancient trail was remade in 1871. Take a 2.25 mile hike (roundtrip) that includes ancient sites and volcanic features.

Park Highlights

There’s lots to see at Place of Refuge so we’ve picked some highlights:

  1. The Great Wall – the wall measures 12 feet tall, 18 feet wide and over 950 feet long. 
  2. Hale o Keawe – the main temple housing the bones of the chiefs. The temple is only able to be viewed from the outside, but it’s an impressive structure.
  3. Pu’uhonua – get up close to the Great Wall and then walk into the Pu’uhonua, or Place of Refuge, itself. 
  4. Keone’ele – this is a sheltered cove that was only for the use of the ali’i to land their canoes. Look out – you might see some turtles here.

Place of Refuge was also a sanctuary during other times. During war it was designated a place for children, elders, and those not involved in warfare to seek sanctuary. Kapu was officially ended in 1819 along with the custom of seeking refuge at Pu’uhonua Hōnaunau.

Make sure you visit Pu’uhonua O Hōnaunau on your Big Island adventure. Learn and discover what life was like in ancient Hawaii at one of the best-preserved historic sites in the state.

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Olive Oil Lemon Cake

This amazingly simple lemon-flavored cake is made using olive oil instead of butter. The olive oil gives the cake a unique flavor and keeps the cake moist – much longer than similar cakes made with butter. It’s easy to make and perfect for any occasion. 

This recipe is courtesy of Samantha Seneviratne at The New York Times.

Ingredients

1 cup/240mL extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for the pan
2 cups/255 grams all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
1 ½ cups/300 grams granulated sugar, plus about 2 tablespoons for sprinkling
3 large eggs, at room temperature
1 tablespoon freshly grated lemon zest plus 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 ¼ cups/295mL whole milk, at room temperature

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375F (350F convection). Grease a 9-inch round cake pan with extra-virgin olive oil. Line the bottom with parchment paper, and then oil the parchment.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda.

In an electric mixer, beat the sugar, eggs and lemon zest until very thick and fluffy, about 5 minutes, set on high.

While the mixer is still running, slowly add in the oil and beat until combined, another 2 minutes.

Cute kitchen moment!

On duty during the making of the cake, Cleo & Ele – providing helpful and encouraging feedback via many cute poses. More Cleo and Ele

Reduce speed to low, and add milk and lemon juice. Gradually add the flour mixture and beat until just combined.

Transfer the batter to the cake pan. Option to sprinkle the top with about 2 tablespoons sugar.

Bake the cake until a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes.

Transfer to a rack to cool for about 20 minutes, then run a knife around the edge to help release the cake from the pan.

This cake is perfect served with whipped cream or Greek yoghurt. 

How did your cake turn out? Let us know in the comments below.

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The Ho’oulu Farmers Market & Artisans Fair

Make sure you stop by one of the best arts & crafts markets on the island! The Ho’oulu Farmers Market & Artisans Fair includes a range of locally made and grown products.

This farmers market located just south of Kailua-Kona has been operating for 13 years. Gail and Greg Smith, along with founder Kuku Keala Ching, created the market and artisans fair. The market is held on the front lawn of the Outrigger Kona Resort and Spa beside Keauhou Bay near Kailua-Kona. The market operates on Wednesdays and Fridays between 9am-2pm.

What you'll find

At this market you’ll find locally grown coffee, produce, seasonal fruit, macadamia nuts, jams, bakery items, local arts and handmade crafts. Live music is also a feature.

Ho’oulu means ‘to grow’ in Hawaiian and the market is one of the longest-standing farmers markets in Kona.

When and where?

The market operates on Wednesdays and Fridays, 9am-2pm. Visit bigislandmkt.com for more information and a list of vendors.

The Ho’oulu Farmers Market & Artisans Fair is a great market in a lovely location, on a large lawn space in Keauhou Bay. We found that the market’s focus on 100% Big Island made, to be a big attraction – for visitors and local residents alike. It does cater more to the arts and craft than the fresh produce seen at other markets, but this is definitely a big plus. A great place to find genuine Hawaiian arts and crafts!

For a full list of Big Island farmers markets check out our blog post Your Guide to Big Island Farmers Markets or download our Timetable of Big Island Farmers Markets.

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