The Keitt Mango

Keitt Mango tree

Mango varieties

If there’s one fruit that is most associated with the tropics, it’s the mango. If you live in an area like Hawaii, where mangoes are grown locally, people almost always have their favorite variety. Some 40 different varieties are grown on the islands, and of these there are about 10 which produce the bulk of the mango crops. There are 5 different mango varieties grown at Horizon, and my favorite, by a long shot, is the Keitt.

Keitt Mango Sliced Open

Mango harvest

The Keitt is a late harvest variety originating out of Florida. It generally ripens from August through October, or even into November. This year it looks like we’ll still have fruit well into November. The other mangoes here on the property, and state-wide in general, are usually finished by July or August.

The Keitt mango

The Keitt mango is huge, easily weighing in between 2 to 4 pounds each! What’s a little unusual about this variety is that it doesn’t change color to indicate that it’s ripe. In years past, I would wait for the expected color change before picking. Unfortunately the fruit then just falls to the ground, turning to a mush from the bruising.

Keitt mango tree trees grow to a medium size, allowing them to bear the heavy fruit they produce. The flesh itself is sweet, with low amounts of fiber, a thin seed, and the skin is green with a purple or red tinge.

This variety is anthracnose resistant, meaning it is resistant to a fungal disease causing dark lesions. The fruit also has a long shelf life.

 

Mango bread with cranberries

The versatile mango

Just like a peach, the versatile mango can be used to flavor pies, jam, chutney, and also ice cream, sorbets, relishes, preserves, juices as well as being used in a wide array of baked goods. Of course, just like a really good peach, nothing beats the fresh fruit, especially when it’s chilled. A fresh mango topped cheese cake, or served alone with vanilla ice cream…yum! Here in Hawaii, mango bread is widely popular as a fruit substitute for banana. 

You’ll often find the mango flavored bread (with cranberries, pictured above) and mango muffins on our buffet breakfast menu.

Mango muffins

Mango wood

Mango wood has become a popular wood both for furniture and also art objects. Mango trees reach maturity for harvesting at between seven to fifteen years, and the wood itself does not require intensive processing and drying. Another reason for its popularity is that it has a very similar look to teak.

Fun fact! Mango wood is sustainable.

The wood is already a byproduct of the industrial mango fruit industry and the trees are quick to mature compared to other varieties of trees. Once the trees have finished fruiting they are harvested for their wood and then replaced with the next crop to then bear fruit.

Mango wood

Besides being an attractive tree, mango produces a beautiful and useful wood. Local craftsman use mango (when they can get it) to produce wooden art work and gorgeous bowls and boxes (as pictured). Mango doesn’t have the cache of koa, but because there is so little available, it ranks up there as far as desirability among the wood workers.

Mango wood boxes

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Summer fruit on the Big Island: from the garden to the breakfast table!

Mango Trees Big Island Hawaii

We’re well into summer here on the Big Island of Hawaii and with it comes an abundance of summer fruit grown right here on the property. Providing in-season fruit direct to the breakfast table for guests every day is our pleasure.

Organically grown in the gardens surrounding Horizon Guest House we currently have a bounty of mangoes, white pineapples, dragon fruit, lychees, and papaya.

Mangoes

Mangoes in Hawaii, is there anything better? We have a number of established trees on the property and this is a staple of our breakfast when in season.

Big Island residents love their mangoes, whether they’re lucky enough to have their own backyard tree or purchased direct from the local Farmer’s Market – the closest one to us is on Sundays in South Kona – be sure to make the most of the mango season from May to October, and come to love them as much as we do.

Did you know? Mangoes aren’t in fact native to the Hawaiian Islands, rather it’s widely thought they arrived here in the early 19th century from Manila.

Mangoes also make a great ingredient in a number of Hawaiian recipes – sauces, salsa, cheesecake, ice cream and even pickles.

 

White pineapple

What’s better than a pineapple? White pineapple. The sweet white flesh of the fruit itself is deliciously creamy, and is also low-acid. Even the core is edible! And it isn’t woody and stringy like other varieties.

Grown mostly by local farmers on the Big Island and available at the local markets, white pineapple also goes by the name of Kona Sugarloaf, Big Island White or White.

Did you know? It’s a myth that pulling a leaf easily from the crown of the pineapple indicates  ripeness.

Among other health benefits pineapple is a great source of potassium, vitamin C, and also fiber.

 

Dragon fruit

Believed by many to be a super fruit, dragon fruit is high in vitamin C, phosphorus and calcium. Red-skinned with red-flesh, orange-skinned with white flesh, and also red skinned with white flesh, it’s a sweet, juicy delight – tasting like a cross between a pear and a melon.

Similar to a kiwifruit because of its small, black, crunchy seeds, dragon fruit can also be added to deserts, smoothies, sorbets and salads.

Did you know? Its name comes from its appearance – like a fireball with its bright pink coloring and green leaves shaped like flames.

Lychee

We’re lucky enough to have a number of lychee trees at Horizon Guest House. When ripe lychees turn a bright red. The red rind conceals within a juicy, white, translucent and gelatinous flesh.

Lychees are a delicious treat – and taste even better chilled. A staple of backyard gardens all over the Big Island they are also naturally high in vitamin C and potassium.

Did you know? The first lychee plant was brought to Hawaii in the 1870s from China.

 

Papaya

Available year round in Hawaii, papaya flourish especially well from spring through to September. Enjoyed as part of the breakfast fruit platter they also make a great snack on their own. Simply scoop out the seeds and replace with a spoonful of yoghurt!

Papaya can not only be added to salads and stews but the black seeds found inside the papaya are edible. The seeds have a sharp, spicy flavor and can be ground and used instead of black pepper.

Did you know? Papaya are originally from southern Mexico but now grow in most tropical countries – of course we believe the best is right here at the bed and breakfast.

Book now and enjoy your breakfast at Horizon Guest House with fresh fruit from the garden direct to our breakfast fruit platter – available daily.