The creamy goodness of mango & haupia pie

Haupia pudding is a traditional coconut milk-based Hawaiian dessert. Popular since the 1940s, it is most often chilled in a retangular pan and then cut into blocks and served. Here, we add it as a topping to a delicious fresh mango filling. 

This recipe utilizes a ‘soft set’ recipe for the haupia, keeping the haupia creamy without letting it harden too much, unlike the traditional ‘hard set’ recipes for haupia that result in a much more gelatine-like consistency.

Mango base

Cut mango into cubes (about 1 inch in size) until you have about 4 cups worth. If you’re using frozen mango, make sure you thaw prior to use. Place in a large bowl.

Mix together the corn starch, sugar and cinnamon. Add mixture to the chopped mango and stir.

Pour into the pie shell (you can use a frozen shell, or make your own).

Cover with aluminium foil and bake at 350F for about 35-40 minutes (until bubbling). Set aside.

Haupia topping

Add corn starch to 1/4 cup of the coconut milk. Stir until all dissolved.

Pour the remaining coconut milk into a saucepan. Add the sugar and the salt. On a medium heat, cook until all of the sugar has dissolved.

Then slowly add the corn starch mixture as you whisk. Keep stirring with the whisk until thickened (this should take about 2-3 minutes).

 

Pour thickened mixture over the mango pie. Let cool to room temperature before refrigerating for at least 1-2 hours.

Serve fresh from the refrigerator with a spoonful of whipped cream!

Traditional haupia pie includes a layer of chocolate or purple sweet potato. The old Hawaiian recipe for haupia actually specifies ground pia instead of the corn starch used today. Ground pia is also known as Polynesian arrowroot.

We hope you enjoyed our version of haupia pie. Have you created a haupia pie with a different filling? Let us know in the comments below.

 

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The Keitt Mango

Last Updated on October 21, 2020 @ 10:37 am
Keitt Mango tree

If there’s one fruit that’s most associated with the tropics, it’s the mango. The Keitt mango is the super-sized variety – a giant serving of delicious, natural sweetness. There are 5 different mango varieties grown at Horizon, and our favorite, by a long shot, is the Keitt.

Mango harvest

Some 40 different varieties are grown on the islands, and of these there are about 10 which produce the bulk of the mango crops. The Keitt is a late harvest variety. It generally ripens from August through October, or even into November. The other mangoes here on the property, and state-wide in general, are usually finished by July or August.

Keitt Mango Sliced Open

The Keitt mango

The Keitt mango is huge, easily weighing in between 2 to 4 pounds each! What’s a little unusual about this variety is that it doesn’t change color to indicate that it’s ripe. In years past, we would wait for the expected color change before picking – the Keitt’s green skin will stay green, even if it’s ripe – and then unfortunately the fruit would fall to the ground, turning to mush from the bruising.

Keitt Mango Big Island Hawaii

Ensure the mango is ripe by pressing gently on the skin – it should give slightly. The mango may need to sit for a few more days after picking to ensure it has ripened enough. Don’t store mangos in the refrigerator as they don’t like the cold. The best way to prepare a mango is to slice around the seed, cutting the flesh in a cross-hatch pattern.

Keitt Mangos fruit bowl Big Island Hawaii
Keitt mangos, bananas, lemons, limes, avocados and rambutan (red & spiky)

History of the Keitt

The Keitt mango originated from a seedling of the Mulgoba cultivar and was named for Mrs J.N. Keitt who planted the first seed in Florida in 1939. By the mid-1940s it was being grown commercially, the variety praised for it’s ease of growing, flavor, and low fiber. This variety is also found throughout Central and South America as well as Hawaii.

Mango bread with cranberries

Keitt mango trees grow to a medium size, allowing them to bear the heavy fruit they produce. The flesh itself is sweet, with low amounts of fiber, a thin seed, and the skin is mostly green with a purple or red tinge. This variety is anthracnose resistant, meaning it is resistant to a fungal disease causing dark lesions. The fruit also has a long shelf life.

The versatile mango

Just like a peach, the versatile mango can be used to flavor pies, jam, chutney, ice cream, sorbets, relishes, preserves, juices as well as being used in a wide array of baked goods. Of course, just like a really good peach, nothing beats the fresh fruit, especially when it’s chilled. A fresh mango topped cheese cake, or served alone with spoonful of vanilla ice cream… yum! Here in Hawaii, mango bread is widely popular as a fruit substitute for banana. When mangos are in season we often make mango flavored bread (with cranberries, pictured above) and mango muffins – a great addition to the breakfast menu.

Mango muffins

Mango wood

Mango wood has become a popular wood both for furniture and also art objects. Mango trees reach maturity for harvesting at between seven to fifteen years. The wood itself does not require intensive processing and drying. Another reason for its popularity is that it has a very similar look to teak.

Fun fact! Mango wood is sustainable. The wood is already a by-product of the industrial mango fruit industry and the trees are quick to mature compared to other trees. Once the trees have finished fruiting they are harvested for their wood and then replaced with the next crop of mangos.

Mango wood

Besides being an attractive tree, it produces a beautiful and useful wood. Local craftsman use mango (when they can get it) to produce wooden art work and beautiful bowls and boxes (as pictured). Mango doesn’t have the cache of koa, but because there is so little available, it ranks up there as far as desirability among the wood workers.

Mango wood boxes

If you’re in Hawaii during mango season, make sure you gorge on the tangy goodness of one the islands’ most delicious fruits.

Used mangos in your cooking? Tell us about your mango-flavored creation in the comments below.

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